News that matters

Published on 2017-05-29     164 views    0 Comments

May 29, 2017: The Republic Day is being celebrated organizing various programmes across the country today.


The first meeting of the Constituent Assembly had declared Nepal a Federal Democratic Republic on 15 Jesth 2065BS (28 May 2008). The Republic Day is marked in commemoration of this very day. The announcement of the federal republic not only formally abolished the 200-plus years old monarchy but also paved a way for radical shift in governance- from the unitary to federal system.


The most striking and positive aspect of Nepal's change of system from monarchy to republic was peaceful and without bloodshed. The world community had taken this development with much surprise.
Although the first Constituent Assembly failed to bring the new constitution dampening people's aspiration for change, the second Constituent Assembly became successful to promulgate the constitution in September 2015.


With the new constitution in place with the mandatory provision of three-tier of election by January 2018, the country held the first round of the local level elections successfully in Province No 3, 4, and 6 on 14 May.


The election of the local levels has again helped pave solid basis for the effective implementation of the new constitution and the federal system.


As the country is marking the 10th Republic Day today, everyone is all set to participate in the second round of local election slated for June 14. The encouraging and enthusiastic participation of people in the first round of local election has indicated that people are for the change and development, so as to implement the federal republic.


The first Constituent Assembly was held in the background of the Second People's Movement of 2062/63. The Movement was made success with the alliance of seven political parties and the rebel Maoists. The rebel Maoists had waged the decade long insurgency before the Second People's Movement. RSS


#  
No comment yet. Be the first one to comment.

Featured

Photo Gallery

Failure isn’t fatal, but failure to change might be.

John Wooden